Roger Remington

Roger Remington received his Ph.D. in Human Experimental Psychology from the University of Oregon in 1978 where he worked with Drs. Steven Keele and Michael Posner on the dynamics of spatial attention. He worked at NASA Ames Research Center since 1980, where he has been the Group Lead for Cognition since 1990. Dr. Remington has published extensively on human attention and information processing, with emphasis on the understanding of complex applied domains. He co-developed several techniques to model human performance in complex domains, such as shuttle cockpit operations and air traffic control. He is currently an ARC Professorial Fellow in the School of Psychology exploring issues in human attention and cognitive modeling.
 
Qualifications
BA Psychology & Linguistics 1974 University of California, Los Angeles
MS Human Experimental Psychology 1976 University of Oregon
PhD Human Experimental Psychology 1978 University of Oregon
 
Contact
Email: r.remington@psy.uq.edu.au
Phone: +617 3365 6412
Office: 24a-460
 
School of Psychology
McElwain Building
The University of Queensland
St Lucia, QLD 4072
Australia
 
 
Publications
 
Remington, R., Wu, S. & Pashler, H. 2011, “What determines saccade timing in sequences of coordinated eye and hand movements?”, Psychonomic bulletin & review, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 538-538-543.
Becker, S.I., Horstmann, G. & Remington, R.W. 2011, “Perceptual grouping, not emotion, accounts for search asymmetries with schematic faces”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance,
Loft, S., Pearcy, B. & Remington, R.W. 2011, “Varying the complexity of the prospective memory decision process in an air traffic control simulation”, Zeitschrift für Psychologie/Journal of Psychology, vol. 219, no. 2, pp. 77-77-84.
Loft, S. & Remington, R.W. 2010, “Prospective memory and task interference in a continuous monitoring dynamic display task”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 145-145-157.
Becker, S.I., Folk, C.L. & Remington, R.W. 2010, “The role of relational information in contingent capture”,Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1460-1460-1476.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R. 2010, “A critical evaluation of the disengagement hypothesis”, Acta Psychologica,vol. 135, no. 2, pp. 103-103-105.
Ruthruff, E., Johnston, J.C. & Remington, R.W. 2009, “How strategic is the central bottleneck: Can it be overcome by trying harder?”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 35, no. 5, pp. 1368-1368-1384.
Lachter, J., Remington, R.W. & Ruthruff, E. 2009, “Space, object, and task selection”, Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, vol. 71, no. 5, pp. 995-995-1014.
Folk, C.L., Remington, R.W. & Wu, S. 2009, “Additivity of abrupt onset effects supports nonspatial distraction, not the capture of spatial attention”, Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, vol. 71, no. 2, pp. 308-308-313.
Loft, S., Kearney, R. & Remington, R. 2008, “Is task interference in event-based prospective memory dependent on cue presentation?”, Memory & cognition, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 139-139-148.
Lien, M., Ruthruff, E., Goodin, Z. & Remington, R.W. 2008, “Contingent attentional capture by top-down control settings: Converging evidence from event-related potentials”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 509-509-530.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R.W. 2008, “Bottom-up priming of top-down attentional control settings”, Visual Cognition, vol. 16, no. 2-3, pp. 215-215-231.
Hazeltine, E., Ruthruff, E. & Remington, R.W. 2006, “The role of input and output modality pairings in dual-task performance: Evidence for content-dependent central interference”, Cognitive psychology, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 291-291-345.
Ruthruff, E., Van Selst, M., Johnston, J.C. & Remington, R. 2006, “How does practice reduce dual-task interference: Integration, automatization, or just stage-shortening?”, Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung, vol. 70, no. 2, pp. 125-125-142.
Ruthruff, E., Hazeltine, E. & Remington, R.W. 2006, “What causes residual dual-task interference after practice?”, Psychological Research/Psychologische Forschung, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 494-494-503.
Lien, M., Allen, P.A., Ruthruff, E., Grabbe, J., McCann, R.S. & Remington, R.W. 2006, “Visual word recognition without central attention: Evidence for greater automaticity with advancing age”, Psychology and aging, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 431-431-447.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R. 2006, “Top-down modulation of preattentive processing: Testing the recovery account of contingent capture”, Visual Cognition, vol. 14, no. 4-8, pp. 445-445-465.
Vera, A.H., John, B.E., Remington, R., Matessa, M. & Freed, M.A. 2005, “Automating Human-Performance Modeling at the Millisecond Level”, Human-Computer Interaction, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 225-225-265.
Lien, M., Ruthruff, E., Remington, R.W. & Johnston, J.C. 2005, “On the Limits of Advance Preparation for a Task Switch: Do People Prepare All the Task Some of the Time or Some of the Task All the Time?”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 299-299-315.
Miller, C.S. & Remington, R.W. 2004, “Modeling Information Navigation: Implications for Information Architecture”, Human-Computer Interaction, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 225-225-271.
Wu, S. & Remington, R.W. 2003, “Characteristics of covert and overt visual orienting: Evidence from attentional and oculomotor capture”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance,vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 1050-1050-1067.
Ruthruff, E., Johnston, J.C., Van Selst, M., Whitsell, S. & Remington, R. 2003, “Vanishing dual-task interference after practice: Has the bottleneck been eliminated or is it merely latent?”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 280-280-289.
Remington, R.W. & Folk, C.L. 2001, “A dissociation between attention and selection”, Psychological Science,vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 511-511-515.
Remington, R.W., Folk, C.L. & McLean, J.P. 2001, “Contingent attentional capture or delayed allocation of attention?”, Perception & psychophysics, vol. 63, no. 2, pp. 298-298-307.
Stone, M., Dismukes, K. & Remington, R. 2001, “Prospective memory in dynamic environments: Effects of load, delay, and phonological rehearsal”, Memory, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 165-165-176.
Ruthruff, E., Remington, R.W. & Johnston, J.C. 2001, “Switching between simple cognitive tasks: The interaction of top-down and bottom-up factors”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 1404-1404-1419.
Remington, R.W., Johnston, J.C., Ruthruff, E., Gold, M. & Romera, M. 2000, “Visual search in complex displays: Factors affecting conflict detection by air traffic controllers”, Human factors, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 349-349-366.
McCann, R.S., Remington, R.W. & Van Selst, M. 2000, “A dual-task investigation of automaticity in visual word processing”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 1352-1352-1370.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R. 1999, “Can new objects override attentional control settings?”, Perception & psychophysics, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 727-727-739.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R. 1998, “Selectivity in distraction by irrelevant featural singletons: Evidence for two forms of attentional capture”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 847-847-858.
Hanna, A. & Remington, R. 1996, “The representation of color and form in long-term memory”, Memory & cognition, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 322-322-330.
Johnston, J.C., McCann, R.S. & Remington, R.W. 1996, Selective attention operates at two processing loci,American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, US.
Folk, C.L. & Remington, R.W. 1996, When knowledge does not help: Limitations on the flexibility of attentional control, American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, US.
Johnston, J.C., McCann, R.S. & Remington, R.W. 1995, “Chronometric evidence for two types of attention”,Psychological Science, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 365-365-369.
Folk, C.L., Remington, R.W. & Wright, J.H. 1994, “The structure of attentional control: Contingent attentional capture by apparent motion, abrupt onset, and color”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 317-317-329.
Folk, C.L., Remington, R.W. & Johnston, J.C. 1993, “Contingent attentional capture: A reply to Yantis (1993)”,Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 682-682-685.
Remington, R.W., Johnston, J.C. & Yantis, S. 1992, “Involuntary attentional capture by abrupt onsets”,Perception & psychophysics, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 279-279-290.
Folk, C.L., Remington, R.W. & Johnston, J.C. 1992, “Involuntary covert orienting is contingent on attentional control settings”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 1030-1030-1044.
Weiss, R.S., Remington, R. & Ellis, S.R. 1989, “Sampling distributions of the entropy in visual scanning”,Behavior Research Methods, Instruments & Computers, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 348-348-352.
Remington, R. & Williams, D. 1986, “On the selection and evaluation of visual display symbology: Factors influencing search and identification times”, Human factors, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 407-407-420.
Remington, R. & Pierce, L. 1984, “Moving attention: Evidence for time-invariant shifts of visual selective attention”, Perception & psychophysics, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 393-393-399.
Remington, R.W. 1980, “Attention and saccadic eye movements”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 6, no. 4, pp. 726-726-744.
Shulman, G.L., Remington, R.W. & McLean, J.P. 1979, “Moving attention through visual space”, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 522-522-526.
Remington, R.W. 1979. Visual attention, detection and the control of saccadic eye movements. Dissertation.

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