James Retell

PhD student.

Research Interests

As we shift our eyes around the world, a surplus of complex visual input hits the retina and feeds through to early visual areas. Yet much of the information present in a visual scene fails to reach our awareness. This is the result of a cognitive system that seems limited to processing only a subset of the visual input from a given scene at any given moment. This is presumably functional as it allows us to selectively attend to aspects of the environment that are of potential importance and interest to us while ignoring distracting and irrelevant information. My research interests lie in understanding the selection mechanisms that parse visual input into relevant and irrelevant information streams and the criteria by which the input is deemed relevant – operations which ultimately underpin our visual percept of the world. One source of information that often reaches our awareness is novel or unexpected events in the world. Currently I am working on understanding how the cognitive system might be sensitive to such events and what exactly it means for a stimulus to be novel.

Find out more at my personal website.

Contact
Email: j.retell@uq.edu.au
Phone: +617 3365 4466
Office: 24-s329

School of Psychology
McElwain Building
The University of Queensland
St Lucia, QLD 4072
Australia

Journal Publications

Finlayson, N.J., Remington, R.W., Retell, J.D., & Grove, P.M. (In Press). Segmentation by depth does not always facilitate visual search. Journal of Vision.

Becker, S.I., Harris, A.M., Venini, D., & Retell, J.D. (In Press). Visual search for colour and shape: When is the gaze guided by feature relationships, when by feature values? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.

Harrison, W. J., Retell, J. D., Remington, R. W., and Mattingley, J. B. (2013). Visual crowding at a distance during predictive remapping. Current Biology, 23, 1–6. Available at:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982213003527.

Conference Abstracts and Posters

Retell, J. D., Becker, S. I., & Remington, R. W. (2013) The contributions of expectancy and prior exposure to the surprise response in visual search. The 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society. Naples, Florida: 10-15 May.

Retell, J. D., Becker, S. I., & Remington, R. W. (2013) The contributions of expectancy and prior exposure to the surprise response in visual search. Proceedings of the 40th Australian Experimental Psychology Conference. Adelaide, Australia: 3-6 April.

Retell, J. D., Kunde, A., Lien, M., & Remington, R. W. (2012). The role of reward in driving attention shifts. The 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society. Naples, Florida: 11-16 May.

Harrison, W., Retell, J. D., Mattingley, J., & Remington, R. (2012). Predictive remapping preserves elementary visual features across saccades. The 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society. Naples, Florida: 11-16 May.

Retell, J. D., Becker, S. I., & Remington, R. W. (2011) A novel result: rare motion transients capture attention. Proceedings of the 38th Australian Experimental Psychology Conference. Sydney, Australia: 12-15 April.

Retell, J. D., Becker, S. I., Remington, R. W. (2010). Breaking the set: surprise capture in a spatial cueing paradigm. The 51st Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. St. Louis, MS: 18-21 November.

Awards

  • Best poster presentation at the 40th Australian Experimental Psychology Conference. Adelaide, Australia: 3-6 April 2013.
  • The University of Queensland, School of Psychology Tutor Excellence Award for 2011

Completed Coursework

https://class.coursera.org/compneuro-001/class/index